This agedashi tofu recipe can be found in Lauren Burns’ first recipe book Food from a Loving Home and is reprinted with her permission.

This agedashi tofu recipe can be found in Lauren Burns first recipe book Food from a Loving Home and is reprinted with her permission.

Agedashi tofu is a Japanese dish of fried tofu served in a flavoursome broth and is complemented by the punch of fresh ginger and clean crispness of daikon radish.

It’s a lovely entree or accompaniment to an Asian-style meal or simply on its own with a bowl of hot rice. Be sure to use medium-soft tofu for this dish - silken tofu will fall apart, while tofu that is too firm will not achieve the beautiful lightness that makes the dish so delicate.

Serves four people.

Ingredients

  • 375g medium-soft fresh tofu
  • Cornflour or potato flour or plain flour, for dusting (cornflour or potato flour will puff up the crust more than plain flour)
  • 60 - 120ml vegetable oil or grapeseed oil, for frying
  • 2 x 10g sachets vegetarian dashi
  • 1 litre water
  • 4 tablespoons mirin
  • 4 tablespoons tamari
  • 1 tablespoon freshly grated daikon radish
  • 4cm piece fresh ginger, grated
  • 2 spring onions, finely chopped

Method

Wrap the tofu in paper towel or a clean tea towel to absorb any moisture, then cut into 3 - 4cm cubes and dust with flour.

Heat the oil in a frying pan until hot, then fry the tofu over a high heat for 2 - 3 minutes each side until light and golden.

The cubes should look like they are about to burst. Drain on paper towel.

To make the broth, combine the dashi and water in a saucepan.

Add the mirin and tamari and heat gently until hot but not boiling.

Pour broth equally into each serving bowl. Divide the tofu among the bowls, then top with daikon and ginger.

Garnish with spring onion to serve.

Posted by Endeavour College of Natural Health
Endeavour College of Natural Health

Endeavour College of Natural Health is Australia's largest Higher Education provider of natural medicine courses.

The College is known as the centre of excellence for natural medicine and is respected for its internationally recognised academic teams and high calibre graduates. Endeavour offers Bachelor of Health Science degrees and Honours programs in Naturopathy, Nutritional and Dietetic Medicine, Acupuncture and Myotherapy, and a fully online Bachelor of Complementary Medicine.

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