Everybody is intuitive and, like any other skill, practice strengthens your ability. Allowing your intuition to guide you through everyday decisions like what to eat, what to wear, how to travel to work, who to spend your time with helps build that ability – and your confidence in it.

“Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. Don't be trapped by dogma - which is living with the results of other people's thinking. Don't let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.” – Steve Jobs.

This now famous speech made by Steve Jobs to students at Stanford University in 2005 is often quoted as a reminder to follow your intuition. Yet, we live in a world heavily focused on logic, facts and figures – making following our innate sense of direction an often conflicting and difficult choice.

For many, relying on intuition is something done only in moments of panic or when faced with major, life altering decisions. It is also in those moments when it can be much harder to hear your inner voice over the noise of others, or your own fear. If you haven’t become familiar with your inner voice before these big life events occur, you may be less likely to spot your inner voice over a noisy (or fearful) crowd, making those big decisions harder to make intuitively.

So what if you lived every moment intuitively? What if you practised listening to your inner voice in quieter moments, becoming familiar with it and fostering a meaningful relationship with your inner tutor?

Everybody is intuitive and, like any other skill, practice strengthens your ability. Allowing your intuition to guide you through everyday decisions like what to eat, what to wear, how to travel to work, who to spend your time with helps build that ability – and your confidence in it.

Regularly choosing from intuition helps you identify the rules and expectations you’ve absorbed, or the opinions of others, helping you to break them down and quiet them. There is freedom in liberating yourself from such limiting rules and expectations.

Steve Jobs was right in saying your heart and intuition already know what you want to become – even if your head or logic, or the opinions and expectations of others, don’t. After all, your life path is not the same life path as everyone else.

Your intuition may not lead you to your destiny in a straight and linear fashion. As Steve also pointed out in his address: “You can't connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something — your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever.”

Your intuition is acting in tandem with whatever that “something” is, leading you exactly where you need to be. By choosing to live intuitively, you will not be led astray.

Posted by Helen Jacobs
Helen Jacobs

Helen Jacobs, founder of The Little Sage, is a modern psychic who practises and teaches living intuitively. She offers psychic readings, private coaching sessions and workshops, products and events to help people connect with their intuition.

Helen has created an eight week course called ‘Living Intuitively’ to help people uncover and pursue their life’s purpose.

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