Prebiotic Coconut Satay Curry

Written by Chelsey Costa | 3 May, 2018

Naturopaths will often look to the gut when determining the origin of many types of disease. Prebiotics by definition is foods or ingredients that selectively promote the growth or activity of beneficial microorganisms (gut bacteria), and are different to the bacteria themselves called probiotics. Prebiotic foods in this recipe include; onion, garlic, asparagus, chickpeas and the vegetables in general. Promoting the growth of beneficial intestinal bacteria has flow-on effects to improve digestive function, the immune system, mental health, skin health and almost every aspect of health.

Cooking time: 30 minutes | Serves: 4

INGREDIENTS

Curry

Garnish

Cauliflower rice

Method:

Enjoy!

Naturopathic notes:

It is important with each meal you eat to ensure that it is balanced. To do this, each meal should be composed of at least 50% vegetables, protein and good fats.

Protein is important for ensuring satiety by a gradual rise in blood sugar levels, rather than an immediate spike followed by a rapid decrease. To ensure intake of the 9 essential amino acids, which are always found in any animal protein known as complete proteins, or through incomplete proteins by combining of any 2 of the following: whole grains and seeds, legumes and/or nuts. This recipe has the essential amino acids by combining chickpeas and peanuts with sesame seeds.

As naturopaths, we believe that disease begins in the gut.  Prebiotics by definition is foods or ingredients that selectively promote the growth or activity of beneficial microorganisms (gut bacteria), and are different to the bacteria themselves called probiotics. Prebiotic foods in this recipe include; onion, garlic, asparagus, chickpeas and the vegetables in general. Promoting the growth of beneficial intestinal bacteria has flow-on effects to improve digestive function, the immune system, mental health, skin health and almost every aspect of health.

Foods rich in polyphenols also enhance the growth of beneficial bacteria. Polyphenols are compounds found in natural foods rich in colour, particularly reds and purple foods. Polyphenol-rich foods in this recipe include red cabbage and red onion. Polyphenols are anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory too!

Whilst naturopaths use herbal medicine in various different forms, one easy way to incorporate herbal medicine is through cooking with a variety of herbs and spices. Some examples include;

Modifications: animal protein such as chicken can be added in too. Other vegetarian options include tempeh or tofu. 


Chelsey Costa

Chelsey is a senior Naturopathy student at Endeavour College Perth campus. Lover of all things herbs, nutrition, sausage dogs, the ocean & coffee. Chelsey is one-half of the @sugarfreesisters.

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